Diabetic Rockstar

adventures with type one diabetes

Category: Diabetes At School (Page 1 of 2)

I’m Going to College… Eventually

wooster20logo_422926704So I told you that I would update you guys on where I decided to go to College.

So here’s the story. I applied to seven smallish liberal arts schools. And then I had a freak out because I had this irrational thought (that’s my new favorite word because I’ve been using it a lot in my AP Psychology class) that I wouldn’t get into any of those schools so I applied on a whim to CSU-Pueblo which is a really easy school to get into because they have even lower standards than Colorado State University and I didn’t have to write an essay or fill out the Common App for them.

And then I got into six of the seven liberal arts schools (one of them weight-listed me) and also got into CSU-Pueblo. So basically eight for eight. It sounds like I am bragging and I am because I’m super proud of myself.

My cousin Katherine goes to Macalester College and I spent a few nights on her dorm room floor and loved it but they gave me exactly no money, so while Mac was super high on my list of schools to choose from, that decided it in itself because every other school gave me a lot of money.

And then I visited the College of Wooster to audition for a music scholarship and fell in love. Because it was Audition Weekend, Wooster went all out in order to make us feel like Wooster was the right choice. And, I tell you, it worked. They had this thing where after our auditions were over they gave us dinner and we sat with different people in the music department at Wooster. Like students, faculty, etc. I sat next to a fourth you in a button down tweed shirt and a bow tie and round glasses. Like Harry Potter glasses. I kid you not. And he was a member of the Wooster Quidditch Team and lives in the Quidditch house. So I was all like, sign me up right now.wooster-cricket-2jpg-2161873298eccf58

After the dinner, we divided into different groups depending on our instrument. The band instrument kids got to go participate in a band rehearsal, the orchestral instrument kids did the same thing, you get the idea. I sat next to the first chair clarinet and had a ton of fun because the music was awesome and they were just having a good time. At one point, the first chair (one of the only music majors in the group) told me to play his solos with him, so I said okay, and then when his solos came around he stopped playing. His solos became my solos. It was scary as heck, but also amazing. Wooster also has a marching band (they wear kilts and are led by bagpipes!!)

The next day, my mom and cousin and I went on an actual tour group of the campus. It basically just sold me more.

But I didn’t want to make a decision yet because I still had two other schools to visit: Trinity University and Knox College. At this point Trinity, Knox, and Wooster were my top three schools.

My mom and I visited Trinity together. I liked it. I didn’t love it. My dad and I visited Knox together on Admitted Student Day. I knew almost twenty minutes into the visit that I would be attending the College of Wooster.

I had no idea how much the “vibe” factored into my decision until I just knew and couldn’t really nail down a concrete reason of why.

A part of it was definitely the music. I knew that I wanted to be able to play in a band without necessarily being a music major which helped me narrow it down. Knox has a kick butt symphony and not a concert band. They have a good jazz band though. Me and my dad and a few other kids had a meeting with the jazz professor so we could ask her questions about my chances of getting into the symphony. However, at this point, I had already decided that I would be going to Wooster, so I almost had zero interest in going to listen to the professor. But I hadn’t told my dad yet since I wanted to hear his opinions before I did anything.

And then I got super low and kind of lost myself in the low blood sugar haziness that we all love and hate so I ate some smarties while I heard that it would be essentially impossible to be a part of the symphony.

At the end of the meeting, my dad asked me if he should go grill the professor about my chances of getting into the symphony, and that’s when I told him that I had already made my choice.

So, for the record, I will be attending the College of Wooster, in Wooster, Ohio for the Class of 2020! I have deferred admission so I don’t have to reapply next year.13363192

Love you lots!

Of Prom and Pumps

Hi guys! Long time no see, err, write! So guess what! I finally finished AP exams, and I really only have two classes to worry about right now, except that I’m not worried because those classes are fine. It’s chemistry and Algebra II. Chemistry can be tricky, but I’m doing fine. But that’s really not what I want to talk about tonight (see title).

Prom was on Saturday! It was really cool to be able to go, because as I’m sure pretty much everyone knows, it’s like the iconic high school dance. But the whole question with prom was: How does managing diabetes fit in?

DSC05230I got a dress that is had some artful wrinkles so my pump would be hidden under my dress. I think I succceeded. My dad said you could only tell that it was there if you looked for it. I also wore shorts underneath my dress so I had something to clip my pump onto.

My group went to P.F. Chang’s for dinner. My plan was to go to the bathroom whenever I needed to bolus (because it’s pretty awkward to hike your floor-length gown up to your waist for any reason, no matter how good it is), and it worked because I didn’t have one high blood sugar. I’m actually pretty proud of that. Also, everyone knew what I was doing when I went to the bathroom, so everything worked out pretty nicely. Oh, and story! There was this three or four year old kid who was sitting at a table that was next to ours, and he kept on staring at us. We noticed but didn’t really say anything. But then his mom and him came up to us, and the mom told us that the little kid thought that we were princesses and to tell him that we were. So I told him, “Yes, we’re princesses, and these are the princes, and we’re going to the ball.” The kid’s face was priceless. His mouth was wide open and he stared at us in complete surprise and shock. He totally believed it, and his parents had to drag him away. He was so cute! He kept coming back to observe the “princesses.” It was awesome.

I did get low during prom, but they had a bar so instead of having the smarties that I brought, I got a Sprite. Haven’t had one of those in a while. Shame that I didn’t really get to enjoy it. DSC05241

And After Prom was a ton of fun too – my boyfriend and I basically just played Texas Hold’em the whole night and got Henna tattoos and ate smoothies and pizza. It turns out that it’s a thing to dress down for After Prom (like sweats and t-shirts dressed down) which Conner (my boyfriend) and I were unaware of, but we went home first and changed so we didn’t stick out. Good thing, too.

Well, that’s prom for your! I can’t wait until next year because it was a ton of fun! If you went to your prom, tell me your stories and how you managed diabetes with it! Either comment or email me.

Lots of love and talk to you soon!

Claire Montgomery

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Claire Does Italy, Italy Does Carbs

So this is the first time I’ve felt good in a while so I’m all jazzed up enough to write. Hi guys!

Me in front of The Arena in Verona. It was a stadium like the Coliseum, except older.

So recently I went on a performing arts trip with my school to, wait for it, ITALY!! Wow. It sure was fun and awesome to go on such a cool trip, and I had such a great time playing in the band and seeing all of the sights. It was amazing.

So one thing that I didn’t contemplate when going to Italy was the sheer amount of carbs they have in the food over there. I mean it makes sense when you think about it. Try eating cereal for breakfast, a pizza/sandwich variation for lunch, and then pasta for dinner every day for a week. It’s carb central, ladies and gentlemen. Oh, and don’t forget the gelato. (It’s darn good. 😉 )

So I ran out of insulin pretty fast and ended up having to change my pump site earlier than I would otherwise. And when I changed it I filled my cartridge with more insulin than I would otherwise, so I was pretty much good for the rest of the trip.

So I’ve just realized that I’ve started every single paragraph with the word “so”. Hehe.

Pisa!

Pisa!

Anyways… Italy! It was so awesome. Like I said earlier, the performing arts department in my school toured there. We went to Venice, Florence, Pisa, Verona, and Lucca. My favorite part was going to Florence and seeing the David by Michelangelo. The trip was more about sightseeing than playing, but we performed four times as well. Our best performance was our second one, which was at a high school in Pisa. We performed for the students there, and they went absolutely berserk! They gave us a standing ovation after every piece we played. I can safely say that I have never received that kind of a reception before, and I probably wont again. But it was so cool to play for kids who are our ages, not to mention witnessing an Italian teenage selfie, and get such a great reception. It was so much fun.

My only beef is that my cheesy pictures with the Leaning Tower of Pisa didn’t turn out. Oh well.

Anyways, ARRIVEDERCI for now!

Claire

Being a Teenager Sucks

I’m not joking. I hate hormones and having to adjust insulin and how I’m never steady even if I count carbs perfectly and take insulin ahead of time (like a good diabetic should, even though apparently that isn’t me) and exercise.

And maybe this happens to every diabetic, but I’m a teenager and thus haven’t been an adult yet so I don’t have anything to base it off of. But it sure is dang annoying.

But being a teenager is stressful. I’m not joking. Like right now the first thing that people ask me when I tell them that I’m a junior in high school is, “What colleges are you thinking about?” Or at least some variation of the above question. And this is super stressful and annoying to a girl who hasn’t mapped out her life plan and has no earthly idea what to do with the next six years of her life, give or take a few, unlike what seems to be the rest of my grade. I don’t know how they do it. And then there are ACT and SAT tests coming up, AP exams are in May, and this year is my first opportunity to go to prom. And lacrosse season has just started, and I was voted captain, and that is sort of stressful because I don’t feel like the greatest girl on the team, even though I may be the oldest. Plus I’m going to have to miss a lot of practices and games because of band rehearsals and things like that, even though the coaches say, “School first, lacrosse second.” Sorry, but lacrosse is not the highest thing on my list of TO DO.

Second semester junior year is wonderful. (Notice the sarcasm.) I even considered quitting lacrosse so I would have more time, but I’m glad I didn’t because it is a ton of fun, even though coaches can get pretty serious.

Plus the whole managing diabetes thing aspect of my life. Kind of a big deal.

On the plus side, I may be getting a new pump sometime soon! And if I ever need a hug, my dog is always available.me and my dog

Adios for now, and may your blood sugars be ever in your favor!

Sincerely,

Claire Montgomery

Insulin Pump Fashion

A couple of days ago I wore a dress with some boots. And as I’m sure that my fellow female diabetic pumpers are aware of, even if you have shorts on underneath your dress, it’s pretty awkward to reach up your dress and take your insulin pump out. And then my problem is that I LOVE wearing dresses, and I would totally wear them every day if it weren’t for people saying, “Why are you wearing a dress?” whenever I DO wear a dress. It’s actually pretty annoying. “Because I felt like it.”

So this time I wore a dress with boots, and then I clipped my insulin pump onto my boots, so I could get my insulin pump without having to feel so awkward about it like I usually do.

So band was my first period, and people kept on bugging me out of genuine curiosity because they obviously didn’t have any idea what an insulin pump was, and I must say that I was enjoying the attention. After band I was checking the list to see who made it into Wind Ensemble (the highest band at my school) when a girl came up to me. Her name is Sam, and she told me that she really liked my Medtronic insulin pump, and that her’s was boring and black. It turns out that a flute who sits three feet away from me is a fellow type 1 diabetic. That pretty much made my day. We talked a little about going to diabetes camp, and then I had to leave to go to class.

So if you wear your insulin pump on your boot, you realize that people have a ton in common with you. That little thing made me happy for the rest of the day. :) And I still am happy.

Sincerely,

Claire Montgomery
Type 1 Diabetic, Diabetic blogger, Insulin pump fashion-ista.

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Party in the Nurse’s Office!

Party in the Nurse’s Office!

Come all ye diabetics and lament about blood sugars…

…’Twill be fun. :

I love the nurse at my high school. She is so awesome and hip and cool. At my old middle school I didn’t really like the nurse, but here she’s awesome. So the other day I’d been having high blood sugars for pretty much the whole day so finally I just went down to the nurse so I could change my site because I figured it was a bad site. But when I got there I didn’t have any insulin so I had to call my dad so he could bring me insulin. I had all of the other supplies. Anyway. So I sat in the nurse’s office while I was waiting for my dad.

And then this kid named Noah came in. He was a diabetic and he was something like over 400 mg/dl. So we were sitting there and talking and lamenting about other nurses that we’ve had that we didn’t like and about insulin pumps and about medical IDs and about tattoos that serve as medical IDs (look them up). And we were talking about iPumps (don’t you think that would be totally wicked? It could count your carbs and test your blood sugar and be your pump AND be your phone, iPod, etc…). It was totally so much fun even though we were just so totally high. And being high is never fun except on that day it was because we could complain to each other and talk about things that nobody else would ever get. Just hanging out with diabetics is fun in general but it was even better this time because we were both high.

And then my dad came and he gave me my insulin and then he left and I gave myself a new site. Blah blah blah.

AND THEN a girl named Nicole came in and she just happened to be a diabetic and she just happened to be high. Join the club, sista. I swear, that’s the best time I’ve ever had in the nurse’s office, and I mean that quite literally. Three diabetics were high at the same time and lamenting about high blood sugars and were in the nurse’s office at the same time. IT WAS SO COOL!

So, a message to all you diabetics who are still in elementary, middle, or high school. Go to the nurse’s office when all the other diabetics in your school are high. It’s fun.

Adios for now!

Claire Montgomery
Type 1 diabetic, Diabetic blogger, Nurse’s office party thrower

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A Try on Cross Country and Diabetes

Okay, so you know how I was having real trouble running Cross Country with diabetes? So my dad does this whole LinkedIn group thing, and he asks questions about diabetes on it. Most recently, questions about how to run cross country with diabetes. So this other dad with a kid a little older then me answered and told Dad about this thing called a SPIbelt. A SPIbelt is this thing that is basically a little belt with a pouch on it that is perfect for running, because IT DOESN’T BOUNCE. I mean, I get annoyed when I run and my test strips click, so when this thing doesn’t bounce, it’s like a blessing.

So my Dad is going to get me a SPIbelt. I can fit some Skittles (haha, I know, ironic) and one of those OneTouch Minis in it. Which is cool because now I won’t have to carry anything in my hands, which is also annoying.

So I suppose that going low is just one of those things that happen when you run, right? And if you’re a diabetic and run Cross Country, please COMMENT so I can get some advise. Which would be really helpful. PRETTY PLEASE. :)

Sincerely,

Claire Montgomery
Type 1 Diabetic, Diabetic Blogger, Cross Country Runner

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Cross Country

Cross Country

Sooo…. About three weeks ago I started high school! Yay!

And high school means sports. And sports to me means cross country. Which I really didn’t want to do, but my parents made me. And it turns out to be pretty fun. The people are nice, not to mention supportive. There’s just one little snag.

Usually I am opposite of most people when it comes to blood sugars and diabetes. Like I usually go high and have to account for that. Except then I joined Cross Country.

There hasn’t been a day when I haven’t gone low. It sucks. Period. And it’s not just the sixty or seventy range. It’s the fifty or forty range, which just makes it worse. And all I can say is THANKS TO GOODNESS that I have my CGM on, or I would probably collapse and fall unconscious (usually I feel my lows, not when I run).

I love my coach. On the first day I gave her my diabetes letter and told her that I had type 1 diabetes. And her first question was, “How are you going to not be low?” Like I said, I love my coach. She knows what diabetes is! She asked the right questions! LUCKY ME! So I said that I usually don’t go low, and that I was going to run with my tester and smarties.

On that first day, I left my glucose tester and smarties in my backpack, because I was only going to run around campus. Bad idea. I was running with another girl, but then I had to turn back because I was feeling seriously shaky and dizzy. It took me about forever to get back. And I was 50 mg/dl. Yup. From then on, I held my tester and smarties in my hands as I ran, and was low EVERY SINGLE DAY. NOT FUN.

It’s gotten to the point that I couldn’t finish my three miles, and nearly cried because of it, because I was so frustrated. I mean, I’m lowering my insulin, I’m eating before hand, what’s going on? Hopefully I’ll figure it out soon.

Sincerely,

Claire Montgomery

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